THE RESULT: In a fantastic fight full of action and momentum swings, Germany’s Abass Baraou managed to outbox and outwork Sam Eggington, as well as beat him at his own game, to take the vacant European super-welterweight title tonight (March 1) in Telford. One step ahead throughout, Baraou hurt Eggington in rounds three, nine and 11 before receiving confirmation of his victory via scorecards which read: 117-111, 117-112, and 114-114.

KEY MOMENTS: The first big shot landed by Baraou arrived in round three when a huge right cross caught Eggington flush and sent his mouthpiece flying across the ring. This helped Eggington to recover from the shot, for the referee immediately halted the action in order to return the mouthpiece to Eggington’s mouth, but he was rocked, of that there was no doubt. He was rocked again in the ninth, too, when a series of right hands got through and had Baraou feeling as though Eggington was there for the taking. It was in this round, as well as the 11th, the referee started to have a closer look at Eggington with a view to possibly saving him for another day.

RECORDS: Baraou, 29, moves to 15-1 (9), whereas Eggington, 30, drops to 34-9 (20).

Abass Baraou and Sam Eggington go to war

TALKING POINT: Along with Nottingham’s Leigh Wood, there is no better TV fighter than Sam Eggington in Britain. Whether in victory or defeat, as was the case tonight, Eggington always brings entertainment to the ring and is reliable in a way most boxers aren’t. In other words, you know exactly what you are getting with Eggington when you see him in the ring and it’s therefore no coincidence Channel 5, which draws more casual fans than perhaps any other platform in the UK, have been so keen to showcase him on Friday nights. He is, in so many ways, a throwback to a bygone era; a time when fighters weren’t satisfied winning unless they had made a serious dent in their opponent. To watch Eggington go about his business brings to mind Diego Corrales, another tall and angular fighter who often sacrificed these physical advantages in order to deliver action to fans and break the heart of his opponent.

QUOTABLE: After the fight, a clearly emotional Baraou said: “It’s been a long journey. I can’t believe I made it so far. I had to face many challenges.” On Eggington, he said: “He’s a warrior and I really respect him.”

WHAT HAPPENS NEXT: Three and a half years after losing his unbeaten record in a close one against Jack Culcay, the Berlin-based Baraou is now a European champion who will no doubt soon be in the mix for a world title shot of some description. At 29, and with an extensive amateur career behind him, there will be an urgency with him now, as well as a push to have him secure the right path to whatever belt he decides to pursue. As for Eggington, older than Baraou by just one year but with plenty of miles on the clock, it remains to be seen where he goes from here. Certainly, though, based on the way he performed against Baraou, a man good enough to mix it with the best, he still has plenty left to offer.